เขียนโปรแกรม สล็อต_รีวิวเกมส์สล็อตออนไลน์_บา คา ร่า วัน ละ 1000_การันตีความสนุก _ทดลองเล่นgclub https://www.google.com//5dd Because companies that are loved win Mon, 20 Nov 2017 19:31:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6.12 Delight Summit update https://www.google.com//5dd/delight-summit-update/ /5dd/delight-summit-update/#respond Mon, 20 Nov 2017 18:11:20 +0000 /5dd/?p=7054 You've probably noticed that we've been quieter than normal in communicating about the 2018 Delight event. After much consideration, we've decided to cancel the 2018 Delight Summit scheduled for May 21-22, 2018 in Portland.

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You’ve probably noticed that we’ve been quieter than normal in communicating about the 2018 Delight event. After much consideration, we’ve decided to cancel the 2018 Delight Summit scheduled for May 21-22, 2018 in Portland.

This was not an easy decision. Organizing Delight annually and running a digital agency are both full time efforts, and we made the decision to double down on supporting our clients and agency business over the next year.

But fear not, Delight is not disappearing! We will be organizing smaller gatherings and events throughout the year as opposed to our one large annual event. Our hope is that these events will both keep the Delight community connected, and also make it more accessible to folks who have been unable to make the annual trek to Portland, Oregon. We’ll be communicating more about these plans heading into 2018.

It goes without saying that anyone who has registered and paid for Delight 2018 will get a full refund, and will jump to the front of the line for access to future events. Over the past five years we’ve had over 100 speakers present to thousands of attendees. Thank you all for your continued support of the Delight community.

We’ll miss seeing you all in Portland together this Spring, but are looking forward to staying connected throughout 2018 and beyond.

Sincerely,
Jeff Cram

P.S. If you have any questions please email us at info@sbobet แจก เครดิต ฟรี www.whatabridewants.com.

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Real insights for designing virtual experiences https://www.google.com//5dd/real-insights-designing-virtual-experiences/ /5dd/real-insights-designing-virtual-experiences/#respond Fri, 05 May 2017 13:51:10 +0000 http://staging.delight.us/?p=6987 Consumer adoption of virtual reality (VR) may just be getting started, but by offering new ways to share stories and connect with users, this nascent technology is already having a big impact. Top players shipped nearly 100 million VR and augmented reality (AR) systems in 2016.1 Worldwide, experts expect the market to exceed $100 billion […]

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Consumer adoption of virtual reality (VR) may just be getting started, but by offering new ways to share stories and connect with users, this nascent technology is already having a big impact.

  • Top players shipped nearly 100 million VR and augmented reality (AR) systems in 2016.1
  • Worldwide, experts expect the market to exceed $100 billion in the next four years.2
  • The Chinese market alone is predicted to be worth $8.5 billion by 2020.3

From building empathy to training doctors and highly skilled workers to (gasp) even hacking your brain, new applications for this technology are being revealed nearly every day. Multiple industries, from retail and entertainment to education and healthcare, are seeing early results〞and still buzzing with anticipation.

So, we threw a VR party and invited the community to share their insights and inspirations. Through the Forest. To the Mountain built three core experiences for visitors inside and around two retro ski gondolas at Connective DX. Guests could receive advice on a snowy VR mountaintop, take 360-degree pano-booth photos to share socially, and contribute to a community graffiti wall of advice and inspiration. Further downstream, the event and the crowdsourced content will be included in a digital web experience and project archive.

Take a ride on this journey and learn from our early explorations in designing virtual experiences.

Over the course of Design Week Portland we shared the experience with more than 100 guests, staff?members and families. While we did not set out to perform user testing (※It*s a party!§), the process of designing and demonstrating our first VR experience showed us some of the hard facts about VR and the seemingly endless possibilities virtual mediums offer.

View inside the VR gondola

เขียนโปรแกรม สล็อต_รีวิวเกมส์สล็อตออนไลน์_บา คา ร่า วัน ละ 1000_การันตีความสนุก _ทดลองเล่นgclub

As soon as VR was on the table, we knew we had to get our Delight Conference partners 360 Labs in on the action. Having built 360 content together for Delight in 2015 and 2016, this would be the first immersive cinematic VR experience we developed together. Engaging 360 Labs early in the process allowed us to understand constraints, ideate quickly and refine our VR daydreams into a quick three-month project. Using 360 Labs* extensive library of cinematic 360 footage of scenic mountainscapes, we cut our production load significantly and could focus on the juicier, community-driven content.

The barriers to getting started in using cinematic 360 are actually very few. Consumer cameras are under $200 (pro models can run $36,000). Video editing and image stitching are relatively common digital skills, and platforms like Vimeo and YouTube just need a bit of metadata or a check box to display 360 content natively. Low-cost or free Google Cardboard viewers are ubiquitous and great starter viewers. Should your creative group or marketing team have some gear around to experiment and test with? Yes! By all means, get acquainted with the gear.

If you*re looking to test the value of storytelling in 360 or need to produce a first project on a tight timeline〞bring in the professionals. The ecosystem is so vast, each service provides a slight variation of the other, and in most cases, you won*t know whether a technology choice is smart for your project until you test it, test it again, and test some more. In the new business realities that VR is creating, the value of partnering with experienced technologists to quickly iterate your ideas cannot be overstated.

Onboarding is guests in vr
Incidental user testing pro tip: Despite the complications of talking over a DJ, user testing at a party* is a great way to meet all your guests, make a connection, and avoid awkward self-introductions.

*This is only good party advice and should not be used in a clinical setting.

Onboarding is real

Onboarding VR is a real challenge you should plan for when building virtual projects. While VR buzz is everywhere, widespread consumer exposure to the technology and understanding of virtual experiences is still pretty limited. Only 10%每15% of the people I shared VR with during Design Week had ever experienced VR before. While it*s possible our event may have been particularly interesting to VR newbies, we also noticed our co-workers had limited exposure to the medium.

※If we*re doing this right, when I hand you these goggles you*re going to be on the mountain. You*ll know quickly if you*re not on the mountain. If you*re not there just tell me and we*ll get you there.§

〞Me, 100+ times recently

Right now there are two camps: Those who own a VR system and those who*ve never tried it. With the number of available applications, platforms and VR devices, even people very familiar with VR may have encountered only one or two systems. A huge part of our evening was learning people*s comfort level and getting them plugged into the gear quickly. (What are people with glasses or big hair supposed to do in VR, anyway?)

Ask, don*t tell

For the moment, VR is a bit of a lonely place. With most entry-level gear, the user is often the only one who can see what they are experiencing and may not be able to communicate well to those outside their simulations. Once someone has acclimated to a VR device, the learning curve improves dramatically, but getting there can be a journey.

Our strategies for directing people through an interface in VR needed to change from commands to questions. Statements like ※put your dot on the play button and tap here§ failed most of the time. Instead, using questions to guide people had much better responses. ※What do you see?§ is unhelpful〞users often need a suggestion and the encouragement to explore. ※Are you on a mountain? Is it moving normal speed? Can you see the expert on the TV in the corner?§ By asking questions your role switches from directing an experience to guiding users to find their own way. Be a VR sherpa.

VR is scary

※I thought it would make me sick.§ ※I didn*t want something overly aggressive or shocking.§

※I was worried about how VR might manipulate me.§
〞VR skeptics I met

People understand the idea that VR can give them super-human perception or abilities, but not everyone is racing to take that red pill into The Matrix. Many new VR users do not expect to be comfortable in or enjoy immersive VR experiences. Several guests I spoke with had been waiting it out until the tech seemed approachable, under control, and safe to explore.

Despite telling each guest that we were sending them to the mountain in our gondola, many were excited to be ※in the VR gondola I*m sitting in.§ Giving the experience context and including familiar visual elements from the actual environment did a lot to reduce initial discomfort and help guests enter the story quickly.

Guests in the experience
There*s a curious pattern of photographing people experiencing VR.

VR users are vulnerable〞protect them

The moment a user enters VR something happens to the people in the room around them. Similar to putting on a blindfold, the user becomes an unwitting fascination and there*s a tendency for people to haze and invade the VR user*s space. People immersed in VR are existing in one reality and perceiving in another reality〞hazing a VR user is a multidimensional sucker punch. It*s your duty as a VR sherpa to make sure they have the space and security to explore your creations.

360 content means endless assets

VR content happens both in space and in time in ways that flat video fails. Even content photographed from a fixed point in VR has the added dimensions of perspective and time, the real time it takes a user to explore a virtual image. It*s a little like the Mannequin Challenge. An interesting thing happens to 360 content when you view it ※flat.§ A single image is infused with an infinite number of display options and opportunities for exploring an idea more deeply or in different formats. When planning your VR content, don*t forget to try a few new views.

A picture with a thousand views

flat.globetopbelowteam_connectiveFour views from the same Connective DX team pano-booth photo.

Check out our 360 pano-booth photos from the event on the Theta S site to further explore the variations that ?images built in VR allow. While the links and transitions between flat screens and 360 content are still clunky, VR is being baked into many content and social platforms. Here are the same pano-booth pics on Facebook or Facebook 360, with yet another viewing experience. Viewers in cinematic 360 don*t direct the action or cinematography, but they can choose their field of view and what they pay attention to. Some of the real magic of VR is in that ability to choose.

Test the length of your content

The conventional knowledge around VR is that shorter experiences are better. Free branded content in the Occulus or Samsung libraries tends to be only a few snackable minutes and wraps one idea quickly. Constraining time is mostly a way to combat battery drain and the discomfort the new technology causes for many people. In other words: Deliver the story before they get sick.

What I saw during our party suggests that people have a tolerance for longer form content as long as they feel comfortable, safe and engaged. We built an extended length program, over 25 minutes of footage and expert advice, which presumed users would enter, explore and exit quickly. While some got a taste and exited, many guests found the scenery and pacing of the experience meditative and stayed “on the mountain.” With no distinct endpoint in the reel, there was no cue to leave.

Based on watching dozens of people interact with our experience, I see a strong case for longer form 360 content, but the market will need improvements in comfort and greater familiarity with the medium before extended play VR really hits. For now, like most aspects of VR, you*ll never know if the length is right unless you test and test again.

Design the ride, not a video

Whether you are a first-time viewer or a new VR experience designer, you never really know what VR will be like until you try it. Creatives, storytellers, educators and anyone with a unique perspective to share should definitely get acquainted with VR. Learn about the devices and interactions available, then find a partner who can help you focus your efforts〞and test, test, test.

Remember VR is bigger than flat photography or video. Think of building for VR like designing an amusement park ride or a guided tour to a far-off land. Added dimensions like comfort, place and point of view mean every step of the ride, from context-setting to goodbye, is a chance to make real connections with your audience. So make them count.

VR has finally established itself as a revolutionary consumer product. The first generations of gear and content have enabled an explosion of interest, content and disruption, but most agree that we*ve only seen the tip of this $100 billion iceberg. Untapped opportunities for empathy, storytelling and education make VR a potentially game-changing tool for retail, media, brands or any organization that values a deep connection with customers. Why not join the party?

1 Paul Armstrong, Just How Big Is The Virtual Reality Market And Where Is It Going Next?, April 6, 2017
2 Tim Merel, The reality of VR/AR growth, January 11, 2017
3 Lulu Chen, China*s Virtual Reality Market Will Be Worth $8.5 Billion and Everyone Wants a Piece, May 15, 2016

How are you using VR to connect with your users? What have you learned that*s informing your experience design practice? Let*s continue the conversation below.

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Navigating uncharted territory with UX researcher Elena Moon https://www.google.com//5dd/navigating-uncharted-territory-ux-researcher-elena-moon/ /5dd/navigating-uncharted-territory-ux-researcher-elena-moon/#respond Thu, 06 Apr 2017 21:21:37 +0000 http://staging.delight.us/?p=6939 Design Week Portland has become a citywide clarion call for the design community to come together, celebrate our collective creativity, and re-engage on the hard questions that lead to meaningful, fulfilling work. The nine-day festival kicks off with two days of main stage programming focused on a big question: ※We are in uncharted territory, What*s […]

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Design Week Portland has become a citywide clarion call for the design community to come together, celebrate our collective creativity, and re-engage on the hard questions that lead to meaningful, fulfilling work. The nine-day festival kicks off with two days of main stage programming focused on a big question: ※We are in uncharted territory, What*s our role in the changing political, social, economic and environmental landscape, as designers?§

To help us get in the Design Week mindset and to navigate its weighty theme, we caught up with 2016 Design Week Portland presenter Elena Moon. In her 2016 main stage talk?Designing for Not Bad, Elena explored the gray-area choices designers commonly face and tactics for making great design work with a soul. (Hint: keep your work focused on solving real problems for real users, even if your §boss§ is a brand.)

As founder of Osage Orange, Elena works closely with clients and teams to research and design elegant, easy-to-use solutions. Elena*s dedication to the real people who use a design or technology has taken her work to the far corners of the globe〞and even space. She*s enjoyed working with organizations like Oregon Zoo, Mozilla, SpaceX, and India*s Barefoot College (a truly fascinating story if you get a chance to ask).

Follow along for our discussion about the designer*s role in driving change, the distinct challenges facing world-traveling creatives, and how working abroad can bolster your design research. Then, take a sneak peek into Elena*s Design Week Portland 2017 itinerary.

Share the love for Design Week〞grab your Design Week Portland Main Stage tickets with our special Delight community discount at the end of this post.
UX researcher Elena Moon
Nathan: You*re known for design research projects that take you around the world. How does being an ※outsider§ or a foreigner help or hamper your work?

Elena: I felt more like a foreigner on Rodeo Drive than I ever did spending time with aboriginal people in Australia and Papua New Guinea or illiterate grandmothers who were studying to become solar engineers in India.

The biggest challenge I’ve faced as an outsider is not a cultural one〞it’s having an outsider’s immune system. Seriously. It’s challenging to stay healthy. Our entire team of eight was taken down with various ailments at some point during or after our trip to Rajasthan and I’ve heard the same story over and over from other teams who are dropped in the middle of challenging physical environments.

Nathan:?What are the challenges or joys of working abroad, outside of your own culture?

Elena:?With our size and cultural dominance, the U.S. is such an insular country. We have the luxury of cultural self-absorption. It’s refreshing to break free from this bubble, to hear other perspectives, to be around cultures that experience community, poverty, materialism, nature, health access, gender roles, and self in utterly different ways. It opens me up, it helps me generate ideas, and it deepens my capacity for problem-solving.

I remember traveling on a barge for 24 hours along the north coast of Papua New Guinea as the only foreigner. On the open deck, the boat informally divided based on gender, and the women quickly grabbed me into their group and in a friendly way said, ※Women here, men over there. It’s better this way.§ We laughed and told stories for the entire trip. That was such a deeply different community and gender experience than I experience in the U.S. When was the last time anyone on public transport created a giant group community?

I usually come back sad for what I see as fractured community and isolation in the States and also grateful for my friendships with men. In so many traditional cultures, the relationship a woman can have with a man is a professional, sexual, or familial one. Platonic friendships are looked at suspiciously, and there is often the assumption from the man that there is sexual interest.

I also come back appreciative that, relative to many other countries, I’m much more free to pursue daily life as a woman and as a queer person, at least in our urban centers, without feeling ostracized or threatened. Though of course, it*s relative. We still have huge issues, and I experience advantages that come from my class and race. In many countries, though, I have had to be accompanied by a male colleague after dusk for personal safety.

Maintaining my physical health is always interesting, too. I was diagnosed with celiac in my mid-thirties, which means I’m microscopically sensitive to gluten and can only eat food prepared in dedicated gluten-free kitchens. That makes travel incredibly challenging as all restaurant food is off limits. In Northern India, every kitchen has a flatbread oven. Navigating that was a total nightmare. In those situations where I*m on the move and am not staying in a place with a kitchen, I carry a little hot pot and run out to markets every day to get a meal put together.

That being said, when I came back from Australia, I saw how broken our healthcare system is. There, the staff has the luxury to immediately talk to you about your health issues. No forms, no insurance grilling, no paperwork to sign saying how you will pay. It made me realize how much of our time, infrastructure, and staffing is wasted to insurance, billing, and going broke.

And well, as you can imagine, homesickness is real.

Nathan:?In your 2016 Design Week Portland talk Designing for Not Bad, you challenged designers to earnestly consider the impact of their work on its users, avoid falling into moral gray zones, and to do no harm. How would your message change this year?

Elena:?Well, if you care about social justice, the environment, democracy, not being ruled by an oligarchy, or corporations having an outsized influence on politics and policy, there’s currently no shortage of work to be done. Do your job and meet your financial needs, but then use your skills to step up and volunteer. Take action in whatever way is meaningful to you. Take a break from Facebook, Instagram, Netflix, and Twitter and use that time to be an engaged citizen. It’s hard to engage in social media without numbing out. Sometimes we feel like we’re doing something because we share a political moment, but don*t mistake that for meaningful action.

Before the election, I started to doubt if the little things I could do would really make a difference. Now I ask: ※If a million other people gave this $5 to a cause I care about or showed up to a march or the airport when we’re about to deport someone, would that make a difference? Can I make time for it?§ If the answer is yes, I do it.

Nathan:?What is a designer*s role in leading change? How can you be certain you*re solving the most important problems, the right way?

Elena:?A good designer will elicit and stay true to the desires and values of both the sponsoring organization and the people who have to use the design. Keeping those desires and values alive and in mind throughout a project makes sure you’re solving the right problems.

Doing it the right way? Well, that*s experience, a solid methodology, skill and good teamwork.

Nathan:?If you could go back in time to tell an earlier you one piece of sage design advice, what would you say? What is one thing you know now that you wish you had known earlier in your career?

Elena:?In my twenties, when I was just getting started in design, I was very flexible in deciding how to choose a job. Aside from generally being interested, it had to involve two of the following: technology, creativity, or nature/the outdoors.

I had all three for a long while and then dropped the outdoor/nature part during the dot-com bust. That was a mistake.

Delight loves Design Week Portland!

Ready to hear more inspiring talks from the design minds powering Portland*s impressive tech growth and keeping Portland weird? Register today and get $100 off your Design Week Portland Main Stage with this special code, just for sbobet แจก เครดิต ฟรี www.whatabridewants.com readers: DELIGHTLOVE

Audience view from Design Week Portland 2016

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Voices of inspiration: Delight speakers share a few of their favorites https://www.google.com//5dd/delight16-speaker-recommendations/ /5dd/delight16-speaker-recommendations/#respond Fri, 17 Mar 2017 20:48:46 +0000 http://staging.delight.us/?p=6927 We’re always looking to expand our bookshelf and podcast list so when we interviewed our Delight 2016 speakers last summer we?asked them for recommendations. Specifically, what was on their “must-read” and “must-listen to” list? Who would they miss if he or she stopped writing or recording tomorrow? Enjoy the list of book recommendations and podcast […]

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We’re always looking to expand our bookshelf and podcast list so when we interviewed our Delight 2016 speakers last summer we?asked them for recommendations. Specifically, what was on their “must-read” and “must-listen to” list? Who would they miss if he or she stopped writing or recording tomorrow? Enjoy the list of book recommendations and podcast favorites.

Michelle Lee, Ideo
Creativity, Inc.,?by Pixar co-founder Ed Catmull, tells the story of how he helped shape the unique culture at Pixar. As someone who thrives in a creative environment and manages a team of designers, I was really curious to gain perspective on how others encourage out-of-the-box ideas and keep teams motivated. As a fan of Pixar’s movies, I loved how the book interspersed management tips with intriguing behind-the-scenes stories of producing movies like?Monsters, Inc.?and?The Incredibles. Great read that will both inspire how you work and keep you entertained throughout.

Andrew Hogan, Forrester Research
There’s a podcast that NPR does called Embedded. It is outstanding. It goes really deep on really big stories, the sort of thing where there might be this vague mention of heroin addiction and opioid addiction, and this is 40 minutes with actual addicts and dealers and talking about what that’s like. For somebody who likes a lot of information about something, it’s a fantastic podcast. I listen to a lot of podcasts that make me think, but this one actually makes me feel something about the story.

Sara Fritsch, Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co.
I love reading a good memoir. So right now I’m reading Phil Knight’s new book called Shoe Dog, which is fascinating. My husband works at Nike, and I can relate so much of it to Schoolhouse. It*s a far different scale, but there are also a lot of similarities. He goes back to when they were in startup mode or smaller, and it’s very relatable. It*s reassuring, when we feel like we’re taking a big risk, you look what he did and you’re like, “oh, this is not that big of a deal.”

I’m going to re-read Essentialism, The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown. And I read the Harry Potter series with my kids, which has been super fun.

David Rose, MIT Media Lab
I have three podcasts that I really really love. I really like 99% Invisible. It’s all about the design of cities. There’s another one called Design Matters, which I really like, and another one that’s just sideways called Song Exploder. Each podcast just takes a song and interviews the musician and has them build it for you like, “How did you come up with the drum track, and where did the inspiration for the song come from? How did you think about the vocal tracks?” They just mix it in front of you so it’s a little bit like cooking for songs.

I have a book recommendation too. Kevin Kelly, who wrote What Technology Wants, has just come out with a new book, which I really like, called The Inevitable. He’s been a writer for Wire for many years.

Tom Bennett, Connective DX
Right now I am reading Eric Larson*s Dead Wake. It shares secrets from the sinking of the Lusitania. I*m obsessed with the passenger liners of the 1930s. I*ve even been a member of the Titanic Historical Society since 1994. I was a little let down when they actually found the wreck, as it was more fun as a mystery.

Also, I have read Neil Stevenson*s Quicksilver (The Baroque Cycle No.1) ?over and over. I think I am on my ninth round. ?I recommend it to people who want to understand the background for Europe*s economic and social structures, and how technology came to shape our world.

I am really missing Jon Stewart. Seeing him again on Colbert was like a breath of fresh air. I also miss the voice of Christopher Hitchens. I wonder what he*d have to say in our current political climate.

Do you have any other recommendations?for us? Something else you would like to add to the list? Let us know in the comments below.?

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For Valentine*s Day, delight heals everyone https://www.google.com//5dd/valentines-day-delight-heals-everyone/ /5dd/valentines-day-delight-heals-everyone/#respond Mon, 13 Feb 2017 17:47:42 +0000 http://staging.delight.us/?p=6879 While most think Valentine*s Day is about chocolate, roses and romance, the biggest givers of heart-shaped tokens by far, are children. It*s clear from pictures made of crayon and crepe paper for mom and dad, and (usually) mass-produced cards for everyone in class, kids adore the holiday. They delight in telling those around them that […]

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While most think Valentine*s Day is about chocolate, roses and romance, the biggest givers of heart-shaped tokens by far, are children. It*s clear from pictures made of crayon and crepe paper for mom and dad, and (usually) mass-produced cards for everyone in class, kids adore the holiday. They delight in telling those around them that they matter and are loved, as well as hearing that back from friends, family and probably even the occasional nemesis.

Little is known for certain about St. Valentine but he has long been associated with the care and healing of children. One story about him that dates back nearly 800 years tells of how he healed a blind girl who was the daughter of his jailer. On the day of his execution, he left her a note signed, ※Your Valentine.§ The persistence of the story makes it clear that people loved the image of a person who, on his last day, continued to focus on the protection and healing of children〞and that such caring brings out the best in us.

Kids have to be kids, even in the hospital. Doctors, parents, friends and even other patients who act on this impulse, to let kids be kids, create amazing moments. We hope you’ll be inspired by these examples, and if you have a favorite personal story of this, please share it here. Perhaps we can inspire each other, all in the name of St. Valentine.

Songs for the world*s bravest kids

When Alastair and Jane found out their daughter Clio had Leukemia, it was a huge new reality for their family. Jane turned to her craft of writing to make sense and share what followed. And Alastair, a singer/songwriter, brought his guitar to Clio*s hospital room. What began as a comfort became a collaboration to make up songs about the journey of healing.

The Grammy-nominated album that followed is a joy for kids with (and without) cancer. And singing their way through this new reality changed how the world looked to Jane and Alastair. Families healing from Sandy Hook or the Boston Marathon bombing were part of their new reality, and they wrote and sang on their behalf. Alastair has raised more than $28,000 to distribute free copies of his songs for families in every children*s cancer center in the U.S.

(Disclosure: I know this family from church. A daughter or two of mine may have even sung backup on the album. I*m biased in the best way. Clio*s back at church and fine, and Alastair played his guitar at service last week. I hope you enjoy the music and get biased too.)

Batman*s heart transplant

Payson Vahovick is six years old, and he*s about to get a heart transplant at Children*s Hospital of Wisconsin. So is his hero doll, Batman. The same tests and preparations that Pason will experience, his Batman doll will face first. And when he wakes up with the new heart, Batman will have been stitched up by the same surgical team that helped Payson.

It*s said that the work of childhood is play. So, when Payson*s doctor, Travis Groth, engages his patients* imagination, he*s allowing them to be working kids. In that moment when a kid is their toy*s caretaker, they get a break from being a patient. They get to be smart and reassuring and, for a moment, a peer to those helping them.

Clowns &fix* the hospital

Here in Boston, Children*s Hospital?has a team of clowns who deliver humor that makes medical care a bit less daunting. Started by the Big Apple Circus in 1986, the Clown Cares program brings trained performers who dress up as clown doctors. Inspired by Dr. Patch Adams, troupes like this use magic, music, storytelling and other clowning skills to help kids deal with the anxieties that even the bravest patients encounter.

Campbell sews hope

No description of caring for kids can be complete without remembering how much kids want to help other kids. Campbell is 12 years old, and he lives in Hobart, Tasmania. Over the last three years, he*s made over 800 plush toys, most of which he personally delivers to sick kids at the Royal Hobart Hospital.

※I just like coming home and making toys§ said Campbell in a Facebook video that has now been viewed 29 million times. He decided he wanted to make a bear a day and began Project 365 by Campbell.

Adventure instead of sedation

Plenty of adults fear CT and MRI scans, so imagine how scary they are for kids. According to Slate magazine as many as 80% of pediatric patients have to be sedated for MRIs. So designers Tom and David Kelley worked with GE to create the Adventure Series of imaging equipment. The machines and the rooms they are in are decorated to look like adventures in outer space, underwater, on a pirate ship, or in the jungle.

Children*s Hospital of Pittsburgh at UPMC says the goal is to ※provide successful distraction therapy that will appeal to all five senses. Three-dimensional decorative elements were created for an enhanced viewing effect, and lights, sounds, and aromatherapy were added to create a one-of-a-kind experience for each and every patient.§

Spider-Man does windows

Patient gives Spider-man a high-five

Photo: UCLA/Reed Hutchinson

At Mattel Children*s Hospital UCLA patients get to see their friendly neighborhood Spider-Man, along with Batman, Captain America, Wonder Woman and the Hulk swing by their windows〞and even clean them. Window cleaners dress up for the hospital*s annual Superhero Day celebration and hang out with the kids, in addition to looking cool while getting the grime off the glass. Rick Kincer, owner of the hospital*s window-washing vendor, Sunland Window Cleaning, started doing this back in 2013.

Radio Lollipop, you*re on the air

There*s something about walking into a new place and hearing your tunes. That*s what Radio Lollipop does for children around the world in more than a dozen hospitals. The program is in full force at Texas Children*s Hospital which runs such an in-house, all-volunteer radio station for kids. ※Volunteer deejays create excitement among patients by playing Top 40 hits, taking call-in requests and putting kids &on air* to actively participate in the magic of radio. Each on-air broadcast also features games, art projects, storytelling and contests in which kids win prizes. Radio Lollipop makes kids feel important by giving them a voice and a choice during their hospital stay, a time when they may have few pleasant choices.§

Whether it*s Saint Valentine, creative parents and kids, or imaginative caregivers, this is one of the best impulses in people. In fact, sharing these stories and these kind acts may be a bit healing itself. If so, that*s our valentine for you.

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Amazing customer experiences: Delight speakers share their favorites https://www.google.com//5dd/amazing-brand-experiences/ /5dd/amazing-brand-experiences/#respond Fri, 20 Jan 2017 07:00:20 +0000 http://staging.delight.us/?p=6841 What makes for an amazing customer experience??In the run-up to Delight 2016, we published a series of spotlight interviews with?many of the speakers. In addition to their work and the topics they would be talking about at the conference, we asked about the?most delightful experiences that they, themselves, had?recently had with a brand. And it […]

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What makes for an amazing customer experience??In the run-up to Delight 2016, we published a series of spotlight interviews with?many of the speakers. In addition to their work and the topics they would be talking about at the conference, we asked about the?most delightful experiences that they, themselves, had?recently had with a brand. And it turned out to be almost everyone’s favorite question!

A?lot has happened since we first interviewed our Delight speakers last summer:?Virgin America is now part of Alaska Airlines,?and the white-hot hype around Pok谷mon GO cooled off pretty quickly. But the underlying qualities that make for an amazing customer experience are evergreen.

Evelyn Huang, Capital One

Evelyn Huang,?VP of Design Thinking &?Strategy, Capital One

Virgin America

I had an almost unbelievably amazing experience with Virgin America. I was headed out to DC, where I fly a lot from San Francisco, where I live. And when I walked through the doors at SFO, the first person I saw was Richard Branson getting interviewed under bright lights. So I stopped and took out my camera, took a photo of him, and sent it to my team that was out east, saying, ※Hey, look. There are celebrities at SFO today.§ And then I went along on my merry way toward the TSA checkpoint.

Maybe 20 seconds later, two flight attendants come up to me, and they said, ※Hey, where are you going today?§ I said, ※I’m going to DC for work.§ And they asked,?※Would you like to ditch work instead and go to Hawaii with Richard Branson?§ And I said, ※Yes.§

Would you like to ditch work instead and go to Hawaii with Richard Branson?§

As it turns out, it was the inaugural flight from San Francisco to Honolulu. And as part of their PR, they were looking for one person, a ※stunt winner,§ who they could convince to completely switch their plans on a dime and go to Hawaii instead of wherever they were going. And I?just?happened to be this person.?On the?flight, and later at the?launch party in Hawaii, I ended up talking to some Virgin America executives〞and they ended up flying my family out as well. It was just the most amazing experience.

Maggie Lang headshotMaggie Lang, Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants

National Car Rental

I recently had quite an amazing experience with National Car Rental. I was in the car with my two kids, running late for the airport, and went to drop off the rental car. We know how we can pay steep prices if we forget to fill the tank up outside. So as I pulled in, I looked at the meter and thought, ※Oh no, I forgot to fill up the tank.§ I’m stressed out, the plane is leaving in, like, 20 minutes, and I’m just not a happy camper.

This lovely woman jumps in and sees the tank. And I said, ※Here we go, here’s my $100, fill up the tank.§ She just winked at me and said, ※Don’t worry about it. We got this. You’re in a hurry here, so be on your way.§ I don’t know if it was because I was so stressed out already and I had my kids with me, but I have never had a car rental do that with me before. I thought that was just a delightful thing for her to do. I talked about it to people, so there you go〞word of mouth.

David RoseDavid Rose, Researcher & Author, MIT Media Lab

Tesla

I think my self-driving Tesla is really one of the most mind blowing experiences I*ve had in the last year. Just to have a car with?a range of 250 miles that is always 100%, charged, because it’s been charging in the garage, and to be able to take your hands off the wheel and have it keep in its lane, follow the person in front of you, and do that for tens of minutes at a time. If I’m driving down to New York, my hands are near the wheel for the entire time, but on the wheel very few times.

I think that’s going to dramatically change how we think about transportation, how we plan cities, and even how we think about car ownership.?Because we*ll start to see self-driving, and even self-parking, cars as more of a service and less of an object. Hopefully, that will get us away from car ownership, away from car storing, away from flooding our cities with parking ramps where we have to be able to walk to our car〞and toward?something that really changes the way we move around the world.

Tom Bennett headshotTom Bennett, Experience Strategist, Connective DX

Mercedes-Benz

Delight comes from a sense of personal attention and being treated like a human.?I recently went car shopping with a friend and found a huge contrast in the experiences from one dealership to another.

At BMW we got very little help and they did nothing to personalize the experience. Then we went to Mercedes where they took us by the hand, talked to my friend about her about her choices, answered her questions and really listened to her. They provided expertise and guidance in all the right ways. Their effort and attention paid off, because she walked out of there with a new car that she loves.

Image of analyst Andrew HoganAndrew Hogan, Analyst, Forrester Research

Pok谷mon GO

Pok谷mon GO was like a textbook example of this phenomenon we have at Forrester Research called ※hyper-adoption,§ which another analyst, James McQuivey, came up with. I often see this happen with early adopter hyper-adoption, but this happened with everybody. There was just this huge community following that happened almost instantly when the app was released (in July of 2016).

And there was a tremendous amount of nostalgia for me as somebody who played these video games. It was this really easy thing to pick up that helped me to connect with a lot of other friends, a lot of other people that I hadn’t even talked to in years. It got me doing things, changing my behavior in positive ways. I was going to places I hadn’t been before, I was talking to lots of people that I hadn’t talked with before, and I was noticing things in the physical world that I hadn’t noticed before.

The hyper-adoption may have peaked and led to hyper-abandonment almost as fast as it took off, but it was still a memorable brand experience that had a huge impact during a short time. There are some small lingering effects too: even now my nephews will ask to walk to the park and catch Pok谷mon〞leading to new memories.

Delight speaker Michelle LeeMichelle Lee,?Design for Play Team Lead, IDEO Toy Lab

Kaiser-Permanente

Going to the doctor is something that isn’t an experience you usually think about as being delightful, but I’ve really come to appreciate Kaiser. I feel like they’ve taken so much time to think through what all the different pain points would be when you go see a doctor.

I went with my son to the pediatrician last week, and they’ve done everything to make the visit as easy and transparent and as seamless as possible: They put a nice play structure in the waiting room, so that he was occupied and didn’t get bored and antsy before going to see the physician. The nurse explained what was coming up so there was nothing unexpected. And the physician really took the time to listen, and she has toys in her room that she was interacting with my child with.

You go in bracing for the worst. When it’s so simple and so easy and so thoughtful, that’s when I feel like it can be really delightful.

Then, there’s a seamless transition from one department to another. We’ll be in to see the doctor, and she’ll coordinate so we’re ready to get labs taken, future appointments are scheduled, prescriptions are sent automatically to the pharmacy. That extra level of detail and consideration are somewhat unexpected in that setting. You go in bracing for the worst. When it’s so simple and so easy and so thoughtful, that’s when I feel like it can be really delightful.

Paul O'Connor

Paul O’Connor, Executive Creative Director, Ziba Design

AT&T

I had to go Canada a couple of weeks ago. With AT&T you’ve?always been able to turn on international packages through the app and whatever. But it’s finally become what I’d say is pretty transparent and easy. You know what you’re doing in there. The ability, for me, to conduct business, to change countries and know I can just change my relationship with the brand really easily is super important. Not to over-emphasize AT&T, but this is part of our theme: What does it mean to allow people to change? When I go international, my role just changed. My needs just changed. How is any brand that’s with me enabling that? We’re getting into a lot of other conversations about transitioning from a device company to a service company. Underlying all those things is how you enable change for people. How do you allow that to be seamless?

What’s the most delightful or memorable experience you’ve had with a brand lately? We’d love to hear about it! Please share your story in the comments below.

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10 can*t miss experience design events for 2017 https://www.google.com//5dd/experience-design-events-2017/ /5dd/experience-design-events-2017/#respond Thu, 05 Jan 2017 19:47:26 +0000 http://staging.delight.us/?p=6829 New year, new batch of experience design events to attend! We know there are hundreds of events to pick from so we*ve compiled a list of some of the best options out there. Whether you want to explore a new field, network with peers, or improve your current skill set, experience design events are excellent […]

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New year, new batch of experience design events to attend! We know there are hundreds of events to pick from so we*ve compiled a list of some of the best options out there. Whether you want to explore a new field, network with peers, or improve your current skill set, experience design events are excellent excuses to get away from your desk and take advantage of professional development opportunities. Plus, if you start planning now you can register while early bird tickets are still on sale and save some money.

What are your can*t miss experience design events for 2017? Leave your picks in the comments below.

Can*t miss experience design events

O*Reilly Design Conference, San Francisco, CA | March 19每22

“The O’Reilly Design Conference is where interaction designers, UX designers, user researchers, product designers, product managers and entrepreneurs will explore new ways design will shape the future. This event is a deep-immersion experience focused on providing designers and anyone who is responsible for a product’s design with the full stack of skills they need to remain competitive and create the next generation of products and services.”

Boston Design Week, Boston, MA | March 29每April 9

“Boston Design Week seeks to increase public awareness and appreciation of all aspects of design, foster recognition of the vital role design plays in our lives, and bring new audiences to a wide array of design industries and organizations. Our vision is to encourage the public to explore all aspects of design.”

Medallia Experience-17, Las Vegas, NV | April 18每21

“Winning companies are in a race to make customer experience their key differentiator. Learn from the world*s leading brands in an inspiring week of problem-solving and exchange designed to redefine your CX journey. Network and strategize with those who speak your language and are committed to making a difference for their customers. Bring your team. Spark conversations. Experience it all.”

Adaptive Path LX, San Francisco, CA | April 24每25

“The LX: Leading Experience?Conference prepares today*s leaders for the next hurdles in design leadership: designing organizations, driving change at scale, and continuously delivering better outcomes for businesses and people. If you*re leading the design and delivery of great experiences, this is your community. Together, we*ll speak frankly about design, organizations, and leadership in a world of increasing complexity.”

Design Week Portland, Portland, OR | April 21每29

“Design Week Portland is a week-long, citywide series of programs exploring the process, craft and practice of design across all disciplines. The mission is to increase appreciation and awareness about design and its far-reaching effects on matters of cultural and social relevance, including community development, education systems and the economy.”

Forrester CXNYC 2017, New York City, NY | June 20每21

“Today*s CX leaders are expected to not just create great experiences, but to deliver CX programs that drive revenue and growth. Doing so requires more than simply meeting or exceeding your customers’ expectations. You must elevate your CX strategies and tools to the next level. To create breakaway CX, disciplined analysis and execution are required. You must target customers who respond best to great experiences, who represent tangible future value, and whose loyalty will grow your business. “

2017 AIGA Design Conference, Minneapolis, MN | October 12每14

“Come dance in the purple rain, soak up the inspiration, and invigorate your creative consciousness as your favorite design icons and creative visionaries take the stage in Minneapolis. Let’s make Prince proud.”

Forrester CXSF 2017, San Francisco, CA | October 19每20

“Today*s CX leaders must create experiences that meet or exceed customer expectations to drive profits. To succeed, CX leaders must not just design outstanding experiences, but assemble the right ecosystems to deliver them while simultaneously demonstrating the business value of customer experience as a discipline and leading its adoption across the organization.”

Delight 2017, Portland, OR | Date TBA

“Delight 2017 is still being planned but we know that it is going to have new format that is focused on?encouraging attendees to build valuable connections. The event will still follow the central idea of creating experiences that people love. An announcement with the date and additional details is coming soon!”

An Event Apart, various cities & dates

Seattle, WA ?| April 3每5
Boston, MA | May 15每17
Washington D.C. | July 10每12
Chicago, IL | August 28每30
San Francisco, CA | October 30每November 1
Denver, CO | December 11每13

“An Event Apart is three days of intense focus on digital design, UX and more. If you care about creating the best possible experiences for the people who use your work, and crave concentrated time to level up your skills in the company of your peers, An Event Apart is the conference you*ve been waiting for.”

Subscribe to Delight Digest?for experience design insights, community news, and exclusive Delight Conference updates.

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Delightful highlights from 2016 https://www.google.com//5dd/2016-highlights/ /5dd/2016-highlights/#respond Thu, 08 Dec 2016 21:28:16 +0000 http://staging.delight.us/?p=6814 Before 2016 wraps up we wanted to take a moment to highlight the most popular posts from sbobet แจก เครดิต ฟรี www.whatabridewants.com from the past 12 months. Our top 10?posts cover a mix of topics ranging from excellent user experiences at Walt Disney World to Delight Conference highlights and speaker spotlights. We hope you like our look back. 1.?Creating […]

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Before 2016 wraps up we wanted to take a moment to highlight the most popular posts from sbobet แจก เครดิต ฟรี www.whatabridewants.com from the past 12 months. Our top 10?posts cover a mix of topics ranging from excellent user experiences at Walt Disney World to Delight Conference highlights and speaker spotlights. We hope you like our look back.

1.?Creating content with compassion at Facebook

Most of us have a pretty routine relationship with Facebook. You wake up, check your News Feed, catch up on posts by friends that make you smile. But sometimes the experience is more intense. At?Delight 2016?Jasmine Probst talked about designing for difficult experiences and showing compassion in these sensitive situations.

2.?Society of Grownups helps millennials take the fear out of finances

Launched with support from MassMutual in 2014, Boston*s?Society of Grownups?provides?a stress-free environment for young adults to get help with financial planning. Through one-on-one advice, classes, supper clubs,?and?online?tools and resources, the organization helps its millennial clients learn about topics ranging from investments and debt to buying a home〞or even a good bottle of wine.

*Editor*s note: In October 2016, Society of Grownups announced they were reorganizing and refocusing their strategy. As a result, they*ve closed their space in Brookline, MA and migrated to an all-digital brand. See details:?Society of Grownups Goes All Digital, All the Time

3.?Design for Real Life: &There*s no checklist for the human experience*

No one sets out to plunge a digital dagger into someone*s emotional well-being〞or even to ruin their?day with a crappy experience. But as Sara Wachter-Boettcher and her co-author Eric Meyer discovered, it happens every day, in spite of our best intentions.?Design for Real Life?is a small book with big implications for the way we approach experience design. Sara was one of our keynote speakers at?Delight 2016 where she talked about some of the challenges she addresses in the book.

4.?Track me if you can〞the data behind my first Boston Marathon

Running is often viewed as a sport that has a low barrier to entry and, until recently, has been pretty low tech. Anyone can throw on a pair of sneakers and run around the block a few times to give running a try. Today, however, running〞and the technology that goes with it〞has entered the 21st?century.

5.?Disney MagicBands create real life magic every day

I*m going to let you in on a little secret: magic is real. I know it might be hard to believe, but Walt Disney World Resorts and Theme Parks created what can only be described as a magical experience with their aptly named ※MagicBands.§

6.?Don*t stop to shop: the promises and pitfalls of grocery technology

Depending on your point of view, grocery shopping can either be a pleasure or a pain, but love it or hate it, it*s something almost all of us have to deal with on a regular basis. And as grocery stores introduce new technology to make shopping more efficient and convenient, nearly everyone experiences the impact〞for better or worse.

7.?Enchanted objects: embedding ordinary things with extraordinary power

In the last 50 years weve seen technological advances that were once the stuff?of fantasy and science fiction〞from?Dick Tracy-style watches?to driver-less cars. Chances?are?youve got a?smartphone within easy reach, and it?does far more than any Star Trek crew member?ever dreamed of.

8.?Designing for play involves more than just fun & games

When we think about play, we often imagine a child*s world of toys and games, but who says play has to be confined to our childhoods? Michelle Lee leads the Design for Play Team at IDEO Toy Lab, an integrated team of researchers, designers and developers bringing engaging, interactive and playful experiences to market.?Their work includes building beloved children*s apps such as Balloonimals and Monster Moves, as well as partnering with respected brands like Sesame Workshop, Fisher-Price and Leapfrog to co-create favorite apps such as the top-ranking Elmo Calls.

9.?Kimpton delight starts with culture

Lots of organizations profess a commitment to customer experience, but few brands go to such?fanatical lengths?as Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants to surprise and delight guests. Even four-legged, furry guests are treated like VIPs! Maggie Lang, Kimpton*s Senior Director of Consumer Marketing and Engagement, says delight is part of something much larger than a campaign, or even a strategy.

10.?We*re going on a field trip!

The breakout is a mainstay of most conferences.?But, inspired by the suggestion of past?Delight Conference?attendees, we*re embedding?these interactive sessions in the community?this year. That means you*ll have the chance to get out and go behind the scenes?at?some of Portland*s coolest work environments and learn first-hand from leaders at each organization.

What would you like us to explore on sbobet แจก เครดิต ฟรี www.whatabridewants.com in 2017? We’re looking for topics in/around the areas of user experience and design. Please let?us know what you want to see in the comments below.

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Delightful dozen: 12 organizations that raise the bar on doing good https://www.google.com//5dd/great-giving-experiences/ /5dd/great-giving-experiences/#respond Wed, 23 Nov 2016 19:47:58 +0000 http://staging.delight.us/?p=6764 Between Black Friday, Cyber Monday and all the other holiday shopping hype, we?hear a lot about the buying experience. But this is?also an important time?for the giving experience. Nonprofit organizations receive about a third of their annual donations between Thanksgiving?and the end of the year. So we wanted to give a heartfelt ※huzzah!§ to some […]

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Between Black Friday, Cyber Monday and all the other holiday shopping hype, we?hear a lot about the buying experience. But this is?also an important time?for the giving experience. Nonprofit organizations receive about a third of their annual donations between Thanksgiving?and the end of the year. So we wanted to give a heartfelt ※huzzah!§ to some of our favorite nonprofits.

Each organization is?creating a great giving experience?in its own unique way〞whether by driving change through social?media, disrupting?philanthropy with?design and technology, optimizing online donations, or simply bringing a smile to someone’s face. We hope it will bring a smile to yours, too!

1. #GivingTuesday

Over?the last five years, #GivingTuesday has emerged alongside?Black Friday and Cyber Monday as a post-Thanksgiving tradition〞a ※global day of giving fueled by the power of social media and collaboration.§ In 2015, the initiative drove ?more than one million donations to U.S. charities, totaling $117 million. Unlike organizations whose mission is to directly support good causes, #GivingTuesday is a movement that brings people together around the values of service and giving back〞and provides the tools for doing so. As its website puts it, ※#GivingTuesday connects diverse groups of individuals, communities and organizations around the world for one common purpose: to celebrate and encourage giving.§

#GivingTuesday makes it easy to get involved with a complete?toolkit with all the resources you need to get started, including free templates for emails, press releases, social media and more. You don’t even have to fill out a form: just download, print, share and start planning your #GivingTuesday campaign.

2. American Red Cross

At Connective DX we support?a number of causes and community services throughout the year, from food drives to fun runs. One of the most meaningful experiences for us in 2016 was the blood drive we hosted in our Portland office with the American Red Cross, which provides?life-saving blood and blood products to people in times of emergency and disasters. We were able to donate enough blood to help 99 people in need. And the Red Cross app lets us track our donations to see the impact.

3. Community Servings/Pie in the Sky

In Boston, we enjoy helping out with the Pie in the Sky project, organized by Community Servings.?Each year, 150 of Greater Boston’s most generous chefs and bakers bake and donate delicious Thanksgiving pies (mmmm, pie!). Better yet, pie proceeds help provide meals and nutrition to the critically ill and homebound in Massachusetts.

Delivering pies

Laura Brown (left) and Jessica Cheng Schrepel (right) boxed up hundreds of pies for Thanksgiving delivery.

4. SOLVE Spring Oregon Beach Cleanup

Here in the Portland office, an annual favorite?is the SOLVE Spring Oregon Beach Cleanup.?Over the last 30 or so years,?nearly 250,000 SOLVE volunteers have removed an estimated 3.3 million pounds of trash from Oregon beaches.?SOLVE brings together individuals?and groups to restore natural spaces around the state, focusing on beach and illegal dump cleanup, planting native trees, removing invasive plants, and other environmental maintenance projects.

Connective DX team members help clean up an Oregon beach

Tom Bennett and Sarah Taylor pitch in to make this Oregon beach even more beautiful.

5. Oregon Humane Society

The Oregon Humane Society gets points for cuddly creativity in support of their mission to ※End Petlessness.§ As their website says, ※There’s a furry soulmate for everyone.§ From the?costumed Pug Crawl and Next Top Dog Model events to the live Kitty Cam and #SnuggleExpress office visits,?they put the ※fun§ in fundraising all year long.

Snuggle Express puppy

This little fur baby got lots of cuddles during the #SnuggleExpress visit to Connective DX in 2015!

6. Heifer International

Heifer International works with communities to end world hunger and poverty and to care for the Earth. Connective DX content strategist?Amber Young says she likes Heifer?because they make gifts feel tangible and explain their worth really well. For example, one popular option is to give the gift of a goat or other life-sustaining animal?to a family in need. For many families, this has become a holiday gift-giving tradition.

7. World Wildlife Fund

The World Wildlife Fund also makes donations feel very personal by allowing you to ※adopt§ endangered animals like elephants and tigers. Their symbolic adoption kits make great gifts, as they come with a stuffed animal, photo and adoption certificate. You can also choose a virtual adoption, in which case more of your donation goes directly to species protection. World Wildlife Fund also has a beautiful, mobile-friendly website. And you can even donate using Apple Pay!

World Wildlife Fund adoption kit

?8. Mercy Corps

We’ve been lucky to have a few?of the most innovative nonprofits share their expertise with the Delight community. At Delight 2016, Mercy Corps hosted a field trip to its headquarters in downtown Portland, Oregon.?Participants joined?Mercy Corps field and other design experts to examine the role of technology, innovation and design in influencing behavior change with audiences who are not receptive to your message.

With its commitment to human-centered design, Mercy Corps innovates by testing ideas in the field, measuring the results, and scaling those that hold the most promise.?For example, they’re?using smartphone technology to communicate with refugees in the Middle East, bringing mobile payments to farmers in Indonesia, and?rethinking how to change a broke and broken humanitarian system.

9. charity: water

Known for its innovative?approach to fundraising,?charity: water?brings clean and safe drinking water to people in developing countries.?The charity: water website makes a clear, compelling case for supporting its mission, saying 663 million people live without clean water. They not only make it easy for you to donate, but also to run your own campaign. You may have seen one of their?birthday pledge campaigns, where you can ask your friends to donate to charity: water instead of buying a birthday gift. And?Like World Wildlife Fund, charity: water now lets you donate via Apple Pay.

Boys playing in clean water

Photo: charity: water

In her session at Delight 2014 Kaitlyn Jankowski (with charity: water at the time) shared how her team enabled great digital experiences for a diverse range of supporters, providing status updates in the form of pictures, GPS insight, and videos from the field. ※We want to inspire people to take action,§ Kaitlyn explained. ※Our creative team thinks about &How close can we get them? How can we tell this story?’§

10. Givesurance

Not all giving experiences come from the charities themselves. Connective DX VP of Digital Enablement Andrew McLaughlin discovered?Givesurance, a startup that allows you to donate a cut of your insurance premiums to charity. It’s?pretty easy to set up through?a simple online form with your insurance company and policy information.?Givesurance then gives you a donation credit of?up to 5% of your payments, which you can donate to one of the 30 or so?partner charities.

You may be wondering what’s in it for Givesurance. As Techcrunch reported when the startup launched out of beta,?consumers effectively replace their old broker with Givesurance, which donates around 30% of its total commission back to its users in the form of donation credits. If one of the charities they partner with aligns with your giving goals, it’s a pretty painless way to support a good cause.

11. Volunteer Match

As its name suggests, Volunteer Match connects volunteers with causes they can support. Longtime Connective DX content strategist Meghan James?likes the experience on their website so much that she used it as a ※best in class§ example for a client project.

Volunteer Match website

Here’s why Meghan?chose it:

  • The site is well-designed to elicit engagement.
  • It shows the inherent connection between its two audiences, while providing experiences specific to each.
  • Volunteer Match also is visible in social channels, which serves both audiences by being easily thought of, found and engaged with.

12. Willamette Week Give!Guide

My personal favorite giving experience is probably the Willamette Week Give!Guide, described as ※Portland*s easiest path to year-end giving.§ Created to encourage the charitable giving habit among the under-35 crowd, the guide selects?141 of Portland*s most impactful nonprofits and ※puts them under one digital roof.§

Instead of having to go to a lot of different?websites and go through multiple transactions, the Give!Guide lets you simply go down the list, enter the amount you want to give to each organization, and pay for it all with one quick online payment.?Then, you receive a receipt from each individual organization so you’re all set for tax time. Alerts pop up (unobtrusively) as new donations come in, and a real-time dashboard shows how much has been donated?so far.

Willamette Week Give Guide dashboard on a smartphone

What can you do?

Of course this list is far from comprehensive〞we keep finding more great examples! To keep from being overwhelmed or to compare different organizations against your giving goals, check GuideStar’s extensive nonprofit database. This holiday giving guide from Charity Navigator has tips for choosing organizations you’d like to support and questions to ask before donating. And if you want to put your own design skills into action for a good cause,?AIGA has a great list of opportunities and resources to do just that.

We like to say ※companies that are loved, win.§ The same is also true for charitable organizations〞and when they?are loved, we all win. Do you have a favorite giving experience? Tell us about it in the comments below, and we’ll throw some love their way!

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On the pitch and off: behind the scenes with Portland Timbers marketing https://www.google.com//5dd/pitch-off-behind-scenes-portland-timbers-marketing/ /5dd/pitch-off-behind-scenes-portland-timbers-marketing/#respond Fri, 04 Nov 2016 16:59:22 +0000 http://staging.delight.us/?p=6754 There*s a lot of talk in marketing about ※building your tribe,§ and a lot of it is just that: talk. Sure, there are brands out there building affinity, but how many can say they have reached the kind of loyalty that gets them regularly featured on ESPN? As part of Delight 2016, I had the […]

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There*s a lot of talk in marketing about ※building your tribe,§ and a lot of it is just that: talk. Sure, there are brands out there building affinity, but how many can say they have reached the kind of loyalty that gets them regularly featured on ESPN?

As part of Delight 2016, I had the pleasure of leading a field trip to Providence Park, home of the 2015 MLS Cup Champion Portland Timbers. The park itself is 90 years old and has a rich history we learned about on our guided tour. For example, newer fans or visitors to Portland might not know who the ※The Jantzen Lady§ hanging near the luxury suites is. But she was part of an advertisement for a local swimwear purveyor and debuted over the left field wall in 1971 when Providence Park still hosted baseball. She stayed in the outfield until a stadium remodel in 2001 brought her inside to her current location.

Tapping into fans* enthusiasm

Cory Dolich, Senior Vice President of Business Operations and Marketing for the Portland Timbers

Cory Dolich, Senior Vice President of Business Operations and Marketing for the Portland Timbers, shares behind-the-scenes stories with Delight attendees.

As interesting as the tour was, and as exciting as it was for fans like myself to get down on the pitch, the real stories came from Cory Dolich, Senior Vice President of Business Operations and Marketing for the Portland Timbers. Cory walked us through the Timbers* approach to marketing a team that already had a 35-year history before even entering Major League Soccer. I mean, what do you focus on when you already have had 100 straight sold-out home games, more than 13,000 people waitlisted for season tickets, and a better than 95% renewal rate?

Cory*s answer: reach. His team is focused on growing the fan base nationally and enhancing the fan experience, especially for those fans who spend years on the waitlist.

Field trip participants got to walk the pitch, get up close to the legendary log that mascot Timber Joey slices after every goal the Timbers score and every ※clean sheet§ the goalkeeper registers. And at the end of the trip, everyone had their pictures taken with the MLS Cup. (Attendees: sbobet แจก เครดิต ฟรี here*s the promised link to your photos).

Guy Bourgault with the MLS Championship Cup

Portland Timbers fan Guy Bourgault of Connective DX gets his moment in the spotlight with the MLS Championship Cup.

We learned from Cory that it*s that dedication to the customers〞the Timbers* fans, their tribe〞that keeps the seats full and the enthusiasm high. Sure, it doesn*t hurt to win the MLS Cup, but Timbers fans are far from fair-weathered. Building upon that passion through year-round engagement is how you maintain your fan base and keep them moving# Onward.

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